Monday, July 24, 2017

Amanuensis Monday: Melvin L Newmark - President of Washington University Alumni Federation - 1963

Amanuensis: A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another.

I continue my project to transcribe family letters, journals, newspaper articles, audiotapes, and other historical artifacts. Not only do the documents contain genealogical information, the words breathe life into kin - some I never met - others I see a time in their life before I knew them.

Below is a newspaper article on, and photograph of, my paternal grandfather, Melvin Newmark.

St. Louis Jewish Light – July 19 1963, p. 8.

Melvin L Newmark (above) St. Louis attorney, has been elected president of the Washington University Alumni Federation for 1963-1964. The Alumni Federation consists of presidents and past presidents of the alumni associations of individual schools at the University. Newmark, who resides at 701 Payson, Dr., Olivette, earned his LLB degree from Washington U. in 1936. He is a past president of the Alumni Association of Washington U., past president of the Missouri Lodge No. 22, B’nai B’rith, and has served in many community service positions. Presently he is a judge on the Municipal Bench of Olivette, a member of the board of the St. Louis Jewish Light, and is active in many other organizations. Mr. and Mrs. Newmark are the parents of three children.


Notes:

1. My grandfather was a municipal court judge from 1962-1967. He was quoted several years later on why he resigned from the position.

2. While I am not short of photographs of my grandfather, I enjoy seeing what he looked like before my recollections.

Amanuensis Monday: Melvin L Newmark - President of United Hebrew Congregation 1971

Amanuensis: A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another.

I continue my project to transcribe family letters, journals, newspaper articles, audiotapes, and other historical artifacts. Not only do the documents contain genealogical information, the words breathe life into kin - some I never met - others I see a time in their life before I knew them.

Below is a newspaper article on, and photograph of, my paternal grandfather, Melvin Newmark.

St. Louis Jewish Light, Dec 1, 1971, p. 26.

Melvin Newmark Elected United Hebrew President

Melvin L. Newmark, an attorney, has been re-elected for a second term as President of United Hebrew Congregation.

Newmark is President of the St. Louis Jewish Light Board of Trustees, a member of the Jewish Federation Board of Directors, and a former president of the Missouri-Illinois Regional Anti-Defamation League Board.

He was re-elected at the recent annual meeting of the congregation, which was addressed by Dr. Louis Schwartzman, Executive Director of the Central Agency for Jewish Education, who discussed, “What We Hope to Achieve for Reform Jewish Education in St. Louis.”

Also elected to office at the same meeting were: Echeal Feinstein, Barnett Goodman and Peter Lurie, vice presidents; George Nemon, secretary, and Joseph Goldstein, treasurer.

Elected to the Board of Directors were: Dan Bogard, Lee Demba, Morris Feldman, Earl Fishgall, Grank Friedman, Joseph C. Friedman, Ralph Friedman, Herman Friedman, Allen Furfine, Elmer Gidlow, Edward Golde, Emil Green, Harold Greenberg, Dr. Milton Jasper, Stanley Laiderman, Sidney Librach, Sam Michelson, I.E. Millstone, Max Orenstein, Morris Rosenthal, Harry T. Schukar, Dr. Irwin Schultz, Dr. Nathan Simon and Eugene Wolff.

Notes:

1. I believe the photograph that accompanied the article is slightly older than the article. Here is a photo from four months earlier, in which his trademark mustache is much more defined. (The wig he is wearing here, is not in the August 1971 photo, though I've seen it in photographs both earlier and later. It is possible he wore it less frequently in the summer.)


Monday, July 17, 2017

Amanuensis Monday: Newton Fulkerson and Jerry Usrey - January 1933

Amanuensis: A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another.

I continue my project to transcribe family letters, journals, newspaper articles, audiotapes, and other historical artifacts. Not only do the documents contain genealogical information, the words breathe life into kin - some I never met - others I see a time in their life before I knew them.

Several articles from Sikeston, Missouri area newspapers tell the story of two deaths in a family a few days apart.

Sikeston Standard Oct 21, 1932, p. 5

Oscar Blackman, who has been visiting with his sister, Mrs. Newt Fulkerson for the past month, accompanied them to his home in Carrier Mills, Ill. We are glad to report that Mr. Fulkerson's conditions is somewhat improved. He has been suffering for some time with heart trouble.

Benton Scott County Democrat, January 19, 1933, p. 1

NEWT FULKERSON DEAD AT McMULLIN

Newt Fulkerson, aged and respected citizen of McMullin, died at his home there Sunday and burial was made at Blodgett Monday. He was sick three or four weeks and was about 80 years of age. Several children survive, among whom are Mrs. Robert Gober of Vanduser and Will Fulkerson of near Sikeston.

The Sikeston Standard, Jan 24, 1933, p. 1

RITES FOR VANDUSER CHILDS HELD SATURDAY

Funeral services were conducted Saturday afternoon from the residence of Mrs. Robert Gober of Vanduser, for her 4-year-old son, Jerry Wayne Usrey, who died Friday of a throat infection. Rev. D. M. Margraves officiated.

The child was buried beside the grave of his grandfather, Newton Fulkerson, who died January 15. Besides his mother and step-father, Robert Gober, he is survived by the following half-sisters and brothers: James W. Usrey, Mrs. Jean Berry and Miss Anna Lee Gober of Vanduser, Raymond Usrey of Cape Girardeau, and Harold and Miss Melba Usrey of Morehouse.

The Sikeston Standard – Jan 24, 1933 p.4
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our many friends for their great kindness during the illness and death of our loved one, Newton Fulkerson. We especially desire to express appreciation to Rev. Margraves and the singers, also the undertaker, Geo. Dempster, and all those who sent floral offering. May God bless each and every one.

Mrs. Newton Fulkerson and Children
The Grandchildren

The Sikeston Standard – Jan 24, 1933 p.8.

Those from Illinois who attended the funeral of Newton Fulkerson were R.S. Hart, Mr. and Mrs. Hosie Blackman, Mrs. Pear King, Mrs. Ella Spears, Mrs. Veda Fulkerson, Lem Fulkerson and daughter, and Oscar Blackman.

Notes:

1) My wife's grandmother, Anna Lee Gober, is mentioned as Jerry Usrey's half-sister.
2) The Sikeston Standard was published twice a week. I checked the January 17th and January 20th issues, but there was no obituary. My general search for "Fulkerson" in January 1933 papers turned up the Benton obituary using the nickname, 'Newt.' I hadn't seen that nickname before; another search retrieved the October article indicating that he had been suffering heart troubles.
3) I didn't make any changes to spelling and grammar. I believe there are a couple misspelled given names in the last article.

Amanuensis Monday: James Herman Fulkerson - Tuberculosis - Age 36 - 1931

Amanuensis: A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another.

I continue my project to transcribe family letters, journals, newspaper articles, audiotapes, and other historical artifacts. Not only do the documents contain genealogical information, the words breathe life into kin - some I never met - others I see a time in their life before I knew them.

A couple articles concerning the death of James Herman Fulkerson, brother of my wife's great- grandmother, Mabel Fulkerson Gober.

Sikeston Standard, March 31, 1931, page 1.

FARMER NEAR MOREHOUSE SUCCUMBS TO TUBERCULOSIS

James Herman Fulkerson, 36 years old, died Sunday evening about 5:00 o’clock, following an illness with tuberculosis. Mr. Fulkerson has been bedfast for about five weeks gradually becoming weaker. He leaves his wife and seven children, all of the home place, to mourn his death.

Funeral services will be conducted Tuesday morning at 10’oclock at the family residence near Morehouse, with Rev. A.C. Rudloff of the First Baptist Church of Sikeston officiating. Interment will be in the Dexter Cemetery with Dempster in charge.

In addition to his wife and children, Mr. Fulkerson is survived by his brother, Willie, of near McMullin, and five sisters, Mrs. Virgil Williams and Mrs. John Healey of Sikeston, Mrs. Ellis Alcorn and Mrs. Sam Usrey of McMullin and Mrs. E.P. Huey of Mountain Grove.

Sikeston Standard, April 4, 1944, page 6

IN MEMORIAM

Gone but not forgotten, though it’s thirteen years, dear brother Jim, since you left us waiting here. We miss your sweet smiles more each day. The voice we loved so well we can hear no more. God knew you were one of the best, so he called you home to rest. God bless you, Brother, in your home above are the prayers from those you loved. Until some fair sweet morn when our hands shall join.

Sadly missed by a sister,
Mrs. Robert Gober.

Notes:

1) In 1931, Mabel was a widow, as her husband Samuel Usrey had died in 1929. She would marry Robert Gober shortly thereafter, as their daughter Anna was born in June of 1932.

Friday, June 23, 2017

Seeking Advice on Searching Newspaper Archives When The Hits Are Numerous

So a local weekly newspaper has recently uploaded 55 years of newspapers to Newspapers.com.
That's 2860 issues.

Simple surname searches on just ancestral surnames (not including various and sundry branches) yield over 3000 hits. An average of at least one relative per issue. I wouldn't be surprised if I started searching on those branches I could get the average up to 2.

Of course, for most of these hits, I don't need to download the article. For classified ads, I might download one occurrence. I don't need to download box scores from high school baseball games. But I still need to go through the results. Keep track of my searches. And do it in such a way that I don't repeat the work.

Any suggestions on process?

***

After some thought, I have come to the realization that when every issue might have an article of interest, search functions are no longer a time-saver. Especially when I am looking for multiple surnames, some of them less unique than others. I have been slowly going through microfilm at the library for a similar local paper, and I will have to treat this one similarly. It will be quicker, since I am not limited to library hours, and reading the online images are easier on the eyes than the microfilm.

Monday, June 19, 2017

Amanuensis Monday: Harold Newmark and the 101st Airborne - 1950

Amanuensis: A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another.

I continue my project to transcribe family letters, journals, newspaper articles, audiotapes, and other historical artifacts. Not only do the documents contain genealogical information, the words breathe life into kin - some I never met - others I see a time in their life before I knew them.

Harold Newmark (1918-2003) was the brother of my grandfather. When I transcribed his obituary, it mentioned he was in the 101st Airborne division during WWII. However, at that time, I didn't know what that may have meant.

The St. Louis Star and Times – Jan 18, 1950 p. 29
Vets of Bulge Reminisce At Area Reunion
By Bob Schulman – Star-Times Staff Writer

BOB CAWEIN, who has only two fingers on his right hand and a jagged scar along his right temple, smiled wryly.

“Five years ago last month, most of us wouldn’t have bet a plugged nickel this meeting would ever be held.”

Cawein’s delight at being present was keenly shared by the 20 other St. Louisans who showed up with him the other evening, in the Armory on Market st.

***

FIVE YEARS AGO they were still members of the 101st Airborne Division, thrown into the snow-covered Belgian town of Bastogne to bleed, freeze, or both, as eight crack Nazi divisions surrounded them in one of the most dramatic episodes of World War II.

The Armory meeting was their first formal reunion since the war. It was called by onetime Pfc. Harold Newmark of University City, vice-president of American Textile Products, Inc., to create a St. Louis chapter of the 101st Airborne Division Association.

The current movie, “Battleground,” is a graphic portrayal of what happened at Bastogne. But until the reminiscences started rolling it was difficult to fit the men at the meeting into the roles.

At Bastogne, the Germans had dubbed them “the big-pocketed butchers.” But now they were just another collection of civilians and an airman.

“We’re not the commando type,” Cawein, a truck lines salesman, conceded with a grin. “I used to wear a size 34 suit. Now I wear a 46.”

Newmark was up from a size 30 to a size 36. George W. (Pops) Hendrix of Webster Groves was down to 119 pounds when they froze him in at Bastogne. Now he’s back to his 168 – quite proper for a man of 45.

Notes:

1) More on the Siege of Bastogne.

Friday, June 9, 2017

Frederick Fulkerson (1759-1824) and Elizabeth Pottinger

Frederick Fulkerson (1759-1824) is one of my wife's fifth great grandfathers.

The phrase "Frederick married to Elizabeth POTTINGER (in 1799) and several others" appears in a handful of places on the internet. And countless other people have copied the facts of a 1799 marriage, and additional unnamed wives. Inevitably, with a few exceptions, five children are attributed to Frederick and Elizabeth, all with dates of birth prior to 1799.

I have a difficult time imagining the logical processes of a family historian who notes Frederick had multiple wives, married one of these wives in 1799, and then assumes that this wife is the mother of Frederick's five children, all born prior to their marriage.

It's certainly possible the 1799 date for the marriage is wrong. If it were wrong by 10 years, that is if the correct marriage year was 1789, that would help with two of the five (three if we allow for a January marriage while Elizabeth was in her final month of pregnancy. That type of thing did happen.) My wife's ancestor, Richard Fulkerson, was the one born January 29, 1789.

Allegedly. I haven't seen the records from which any of the dates involved are taken.
I have not recorded Elizabeth Pottinger as my wife's fifth great grandmother.

I suggest anyone reading this who have Frederick and Elizabeth in their database as ancestors should put a huge question mark beside Elizabeth's name in their notes. Unless they have records to back it up. In which case, please contact me.

Monday, June 5, 2017

Amanuensis Monday: Anton Schrock on Grape Culture in Bollinger County Missouri in 1880

Amanuensis: A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another.

I continue my project to transcribe family letters, journals, newspaper articles, audiotapes, and other historical artifacts. Not only do the documents contain genealogical information, the words breathe life into kin - some I never met - others I see a time in their life before I knew them.

My wife's 3rd great Grandfather, Anton Schrock (1819-1900) was quoted in a Special Report of the US Department of Agriculture. Special Report #36, "Report Upon Statistics of Grape Culture and Wine Production in the United States for 1880," p. 73.

ANTON Schrock, Marble Hill, Bollinger County:

Bollinger County has a considerable area which seems well adapted to grapes that are excellent for table use and the production of wine. Those now engaged in grape culture in this vicinity are only amateurs, and cultivate by small patches of one-half acre to three acres, apart from their regular business of farming. Some sell their grapes in our towns or send them to Saint Louis. I make wine in a small way because it has dull sale here. We need immigration of Germans from the wine provinces who perfectly understand grape culture and the manufacture of wine. The Ives and Hartford do well, but the Norton's Virginia does the best. Concord bore abundantly last year.

Notes:

1) Norton wines still do well in Missouri.
2) There is an "Abram Fulkerson" who is quoted directly above Schrock in the report. He is possibly related in some fashion to my wife's Fulkerson ancestors.

Saturday, June 3, 2017

The ancestor who moved the farthest

Randy Seaver at Geneamusings asks: Which of your ancestors moved the farthest from home?

Of course, I first think about my ancestors who immigrated from Eastern Europe

  • My second great grandparents, Moshe Leyb and Minnie Cruvant, and their family moved 4,872 miles from Cekiske, Lithuania to St. Louis, Missouri
  • My second great grandfather, Morris Blatt, and his daughters moved 4,980 miles from Losice, Poland to St. Louis
  • My maternal grandfather, Martin Deutsch moved 5,236 mies from Varalmas, Hungary (now Almasu, Romania) to Chicago, Illinois, and then to St. Louis. (He accompanied his parents and siblings on the first, and longest leg of the journey.)
  • My second great grandparents, Selig and Annie Feinstein, and their family either moved 5,260 miles from Zhitomir, Ukraine to St. Louis, or 5,477 miles from Oleksandriya, Ukraine to St. Louis. (Those are the two most likely origin points for his family.)
So the Feinsteins win for distance, right?

Well, there is more than one way to define "move."  My paternal grandfather, Melvin Newmark, while serving during World War II, was stationed in Australia, easily beating them all. My maternal grandfather was stationed in Africa and the Middle East. Thankfully, both returned to their homes in St. Louis.